Job's Nursery LLC

Helping Tri-City Gardeners Grow for 75 Years!

Job's Nursery LLC is a family owned nursery and tree farm that offers a wide selection of outdoor plants that are hardy for our area. We are located just north of Pasco on Columbia River Road.  It's a short trip to a beautiful location to escape the hustle and bustle of your everyday life.

Plants of the Week for August 31st

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Rosie the Riveter Rose is a uniquely shaped rose that pays tribute to woman who worked in manufacturing and shipyards during World War II.  We have been very pleased with it's color, amount of blooming and disease resistance throughout the summer.  The gold blend contrasts well against the dark green foliage. It's a floribunda, so it blooms in clusters and is free flowering leaving it to be pretty easy to care for. Like other roses it prefers at least 6 hours of direct sunlight.

Little Miss Miscanthus Grass is a dwarf Miscanthus with very showy florescence and turns red in late summer early fall.  It grows to about 2 to 3 feet tall and wide. Little Miss prefers at least 6 hours of direct sunlight. A fun little show stopper for perennial beds or desert landscapes on drip. 

Plants of the Week of August 17th, 2018

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This week is a Rose of Sharon twofer.  It's Rose of Sharon season and pollinators love them as you can see with the huge bumble bee. Rose of Sharons reach about 10 to 12 feet tall and 6 feet wide.  They prefer to be planted in full sun but can tolerate morning shade.  They are great for focal points or privacy screens. They flower from July to September, while it's hot out.

Lavender Chiffon is a double lavender variety that has a full petal count.  It's one of the fullest of the double bloomers.  A vigorous grower that wants to flower when it's hot out. 

Blue Chiffon is a blue lavender semi-double bloom.  Not quite as full as the Lavender Chiffon but the color is a good blue for July gardens to celebrate the Fourth of July. 

First Year Watering Guide

Watering for the First Year

In the first growing season, all new plants (including drought resistant ones) need extra water to allow them root into the surrounding soil. Make sure to deep soak the plants enough with a sprinkler on a hose; so that your soil is moist to 12 inches below the surface of the dirt a day after you have watered. You want your moisture to soak in this deep so that your plant’s roots develop deep and can handle not being watered for a few days in case there are problems with your irrigation system. If in doubt, you need to dig down 12 inches with a shovel, trowel or use a soil probe to make sure you are soaking in deep enough.

A general deep soaking schedule for sand loam soil (the main soil texture for Tri-Cities) it is listed by day time high temperatures
 

50 ̊F or less once a month for evergreens, check every two months for deciduous plants 50 to 70 ̊F deep soak once every two weeks after foliage emerges or drops on deciduous

70 to 85 ̊F deep soak once a week for one hour
85 to 95 ̊F deep soak twice a week for two hours
Above 95 ̊F soak three times a week for two hours
After all wind storms when temperature highs are above 85 ̊F go check the soil moisture.
**For Clay or compacted soil you will need to shorten you water run time and increase the amount of time your water to get the same effect**